Tag Archives: hop farm life

Time to Celebrate with our First Ever Annual Hop Walk

Based just beside the stunning Malvern hills, just off a country lane in Bromyard, Brook House Hops are a hidden gem in the Herefordshire countryside.

Boasting just shy of 100 acres of hop fields, we have been selling our UK hops to brewers all over the country since last year but this year was our first ever organised hop walk.

Alongside brewers from far and wide, the Brook House team joined representatives from Hobsons Brewery, Wye Valley Brewery and Marston’s Brewery on a day out at the farm, exploring the long and luscious hop bines out in the fields and discussing the industry and what was next in store for beer.

Sebastian Nielsen, Sales Manager for the farm, said it was a great day of celebrating British produce: “Our ethos is to provide the best UK grown hop products to support brewers in their quest for the creation of unique, crafted products. We are unusual in that we sell hops directly to brewers, instead of through the big merchants. We want to directly support brewers and the hop walk was a great celebration of UK industry. We even had lunch provided by Legges – legendary 4th generation Bromyard butchers!”

Sales manager Sebastian Nielsen providing green hops for Boss Brewing

A young, ambitious team, Brook House have a unique story to tell and we were keen to spend a day with likeminded people with a passion for beer and hops. The farm has a history of world-class, award-winning hop cultivation thanks to the rich, red, Herefordshire soil and in the past, it was famous for all types of farming from rearing livestock to growing cider apples. We sell differently too – directly and not through hop merchants. By cutting out the middleman, we believe we can listen more closely to trends and provide their customers with a personalised service.

The event was a big deal for the region, Sebastian continues: “In the brewing world an annual hop walk is a big event, looked forward to all year round as an occasion for brewers, beer writers, beer enthusiasts and hop farmers to get together and enjoy each other’s company whilst watching the annual harvest. We hope that everybody got something from the day.”

The tour took the groups out into the fields to look at the beautiful hop bines, sturdy and strong after a great year of sunshine and plenty of rain, as well as into the working production plant, which was busy with harvest workers. There we watched the hops being taken from the bines, separated from the leaves, dried and processed, ready to be sent out and made into great beer.

Many brewers took the opportunity to grab some green hops – hops that are not yet dried, and therefore give the beer a uniquely fresh and crisp aroma. Green ale is a growing trend in brewing, and it tastes best when the hops are as fresh as can be. What could be better than hops direct from the UK countryside?

After the tour, lunch was served and the debating started. Which is best – UK or US hops? What are the trends for 2019? How is the New Zealand harvest doing? What types of beer are popular and growing right now? It certainly made for an interesting roundup to a great day and a wonderful celebration of what makes Brook House proud to be a part of the UK brewing industry.

New Zealand Hops – What is All The Fuss About?

New Zealand hops are the most sought after on the market right now. But why? They have a tropical flavour profile that aligns perfectly with the IPA craze, which could be the main reason. But is that it? Is this the reason why most brewers find access to them limited and they are thus so hard to come by?

Hop bines

In this article, we will dig under the surface a little and explore the different reasons why hops from New Zealand are in such high demand.

They are very tasty hops

The most obvious answer to why hops from New Zealand are so popular is that they help to make great beers. These hops are cultivated and processed to a high standard – not to mention they have a flavour profile that suits the beers we like to drink – so it makes sense that they are highly sought after. New Zealand hops are also unique in their chemical composition, which is partly down to the New Zealand terroir, meaning that the individual essential oil and alpha acid composition cannot be replicated elsewhere in the world.

Hops

They are hard to come by

Beer writer Stan Hieronymus over at Appellaion Beer did some research following the 2019 New Zealand hops harvest which clearly shows why demand is outstripping supply at the moment. The quantity grown is tiny compared to other popular hops right now, so there is a mad dash and then they are gone. But things are looking up if you are keen to use types of New Zealand hops in the coming years…

“New Zealand Hops Limited harvested 44 percent more hops in 2019 than 2018. Production of Nelson Sauvin, one of the most sought out hops anywhere, increased 35 percent and Motueka 69 percent. However, demand — particularly for Nelson — continues to exceed supply. A little math makes it obvious why. Farmers in the American Northwest harvested about 107 million pounds of hops in 2018; NZ Hops 2.3 million.” (From Stan’s July Newsletter)

Insightful. Stan also mentions that New Zealand growers expanded their acreage by 70% this year, which is good news for everyone. At the same time, 90% of the 2019 crop was already sold before harvest, so it could take a while before we see the prices drop and for the hops to become more readily available.

A full report on the 2019 New Zealand hop harvest should soon be available at New Zealand Hops, grower cooperative website.

Glorious fragran hops

We love new things

There is also a very human reason why brewers are so keen on these hops; they are new. Experimenters and creators love new ways of creating their art. When a unique variety of paint comes out, artist flock to try it. When a new way of recording music is found, musicians must see what it can add to their sound.

Craft brewers are absolutely no different. When a new hop comes to town, they have to try it to find out what it can bring to their beer. It’s exciting. It is a new tool in their toolbox, something to improve the complexity of their beers with.

As dedicated hop growers and beer drinkers, we at Brook House Hops are very grateful that New Zealand hops arrived on the scene and we want to do everything we can to bring them over to the UK for brewers to play with. It’s a great time for beer right now.

Battery Hill Hops on tour

Recently, to cement our love of the New Zealand hop offering, we took the three Clayton brothers from New Zealand’s largest hop farm on a tour of UK breweries and brewing history. They found it fascinating and we had a great time.

Traditional versus Modern UK Breweries
Left: Greene King, Suffolk
Right: Camden Town Brewery, London

Our partnership with them means that we can supply hops like Riwaka, Rakau, Pacifica and Nelson Sauvin in the coming years. At present, we have some 2019 Motueka in stock online, so get in there quick if you would like to brew with this extra special, zesty beauty!

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